Tag Archives: 3M Health Care Academy

Jan 24, 2017

Better medical adhesives, better outcomes

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Even under normal conditions it’s tough to stick something to skin. Skin is flexible. It stretches and sweats. Skin’s natural oils cause water to bead up. A medical adhesive must accommodate all these conditions and more.

And stickiness is only half the equation. A medical adhesive must also remove easily, without causing pain, and without leaving residue or damaging often delicate skin.

Surgical Drape Health Care Academy Learning Course

Learn the “do and don’t” of draping and taping

The science of sticky

A pressure-sensitive adhesive that sticks firmly yet is easy to remove requires the right physical properties. It must tolerate movement and moisture, and be scientifically formulated to transmit vapor away from the skin.

Creating such an adhesive requires cutting-edge science and technology. It takes a multi-disciplinary approach that combines the efforts of numerous professionals including engineers, chemists and biologists. But the results are worth the effort: better patient experience and a higher standard of care.

Wound care that helps heal, doesn’t hurt

A good wound dressing helps create an environment where a wound can heal. And it does the job without increasing the risk of Medical Adhesive-Related Skin Injuries (MARSI).

The adhesive in the dressing plays an important role. It should move vapor away from the skin to prevent moisture build-up that could cause the adhesive to fail and the dressing to lift. When a dressing is removed from skin the adhesive should facilitate a removal that is gentle, doesn’t cause pain and doesn’t leave a residue.

Medical adhesives are also a critical component of the numerous medical tapes used throughout the health care continuum. Health care providers need a variety of tapes to address a variety of clinical needs. Some medical tapes feature high adhesion for damp skin. Others, like some silicone tapes, can be easily repositioned or cleanly removed without causing pain.

A surgical drape that stays put

One of the most significant risks to a patient during surgery is the bacteria that lives on their own skin. Surgical preps do not sterilize the skin. There is always some bacteria left on the patient’s skin even after the most effective prep.

An incise drape, applied before surgery begins, provides a sterile surface all the way to the edge of the surgical wound. The drape immobilizes bacteria on the skin to help reduce the risk of bacterial wound contamination. But in order to reduce the risk of surgical site contamination, the drape must stay put.

Many procedures, like heart surgery, require the surgeon to retract the skin after incision which puts a lot of stress on the drape. You must have a good adhesive to keep the drape in place. And drape lift during surgery has been associated with an increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI).1 An adhesive with a high degree of stickiness can help prevent drape lift.

Deploying science to improve patient experience and cost of care

For patients, a wound dressing or surgical drape that works as intended helps achieve the desired outcomes and avoid complications that can cause the patient and their family pain, suffering and expense. And it gives health care professionals the peace of mind they’re doing all they can to provide the best possible standard of care.

Science plays a role in choosing a clinical approach. But it’s how science is used to comfort and protect patients that makes it powerful.

Featured 3MSM Health Care Academy learning course, Medical Grade Adhesives: The Do and Don’t of Draping and Taping.

1Alexander JW, Aerni S, and Plettner JP. 1985. Development of a safe and effective one-minute preoperative skin preparation. Arch Surg. 120:1357-1361.

Mar 9, 2016

Applying the Science of Human Factors Engineering to Medical Device Reprocessing

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Endoscope Reprocessing with elevator down

You may not have heard about human factors engineering. But without question, the underlying concepts lie at the heart of what you do every day in a busy Sterile Processing department.As you strive to manage and improve processes and procedures to keep your department running efficiently, human factors provides a new perspective, and, quite possibly, new inspiration. Put simply, human factors is the science behind how we as humans relate to our processes, work methods, and environments. Where do we operate at our most productive levels? Where do we make errors? Why, and how, do we improve? A slightly less general view involves engineers solving the problems that arise when humans integrate with devices and systems, using the scientific method – testing and gathering data, rather than depending on common sense or simple “gut feel.” The specifics are exciting. Beginning with medical device manufacturers, human factors can help to design and verify the processes used for medical device reprocessing. It can include how processes and procedures are communicated for maximum understanding and compliance. It can even include the design of the instruments themselves. In your department, applying human factors engineering can help you define processes that can be performed in your specific, real-world environment. It can also help you establish education, training, and competency verification tools to ensure staff have the necessary information and skills. 3M would like to invite you to learn more about human factors. Our educational webinar, How can Human Factors Engineering Concepts be Applied to Medical Device Reprocessing? explores how human factors affects the design of medical devices and processes. You’ll learn about:

  • How human factors engineering affects instrument and instrument set design
  • Proper design and content of Instructions for Use (IFUs)
  • Design of reprocessing procedures
  • Applying protocols
  • And much more.

Facilitated by 3M’s Christophe de Campeau and Dorothy Larson and featuring Susan Klacik, CSS Manager at St. Elizabeth’s Healthcare, Youngstown, OH and educational consultant to 3M Health Care, this presentation also features case studies that illustrate how human factors can make a difference in any department. View this webinar and other webinars about Sterile Processing at 3M Healthcare Academy.

Feb 12, 2016

If You Struggle With Sterile Processing, Then Read This

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Sterile processing department

Sterile processing is an important function that is vital to every health care facility. Sterile processing technicians need up-to-date, helpful information about standards, guidelines, and recommended practices. To make it easy for technicians to learn best practices, 3MSM  Health Care Academy created a full catalog of free self-study and live continuing education (CE) courses presented by technical experts. Here is a list of some of the most popular 1 hour sterile processing CE courses over the past 12 months.

Sterilization & Disinfection in an ASC Setting

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the latest requirements and guidelines from accrediting organizations specifically relating to reprocessing of medical devices.
  • Describe key published standards and recommended practices for safe and effective reprocessing of reusable patient care items.
  • List available resources that can help an ASC comply with best practice related to reprocessing of reusable medical devices.

ST79 Essentials for ASCs

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss AAMI ST79 and the need for the recommended practice.
  • Discuss the different types of steam sterilization processes and cycle parameters.
  • Describe the different types of sterilization monitoring devices, including PCDs.
  • Describe routine load release for implants and non-implants.

What a Gas: A Review of Today’s Low Temperature Sterilization Options

Learning Objectives:

  • List the low temperature sterilization technologies that are available in the industry today.
  • Describe how each of the low temperature sterilization technologies work.
  • Recognize the benefits and limitations of each low temperature sterilization technology.
  • Identify the factors to be considered for choosing a low temperature sterilization technology.

IUSS – Follow the Standards or Get Cited!

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the most current AORN and AAMI standards and recommended practices relating to IUSS.
  • Explain CMS’s Update of Survey and Certification Memorandum Regarding IUSS.
  • Identify The Joint Commissions’ standards related to IUSS.

Steam Sterilization Qualification and Troubleshooting: Process Failures and Wet Packs

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss steam sterilization qualification testing.
  • Describe available tools to help guide an investigational process on sterilization process failures and wet pack/load assessment.
  • Identify common reasons for steam sterilization process failures and wet packs/loads.

Are you following me? A Surgical Instrument Tray Tracer

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how tracer methodology applies to sterile processing.
  • Discuss how IFU’s, competencies and processes may be observed by surveyors.
  • Understand the importance of following manufacturers’ IFU.

Duodenoscopes: Are Current Reprocessing Guidelines Adequate?

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain why duodenoscope reprocessing is currently under scrutiny.
  • Summarize the clinical literature describing outbreaks following exposure to duodenoscopes.
  • Discuss the reprocessing challenges that are unique to duodenoscopes.
  • Outline available and proposed options for improving duodenoscope reprocessing.

The Nuts and Bolts of Washers and Disinfectors

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the steps in a washer/disinfector cycle and the purpose of each step
  • Discuss thermal disinfection and the A0 concept
  • Review means to optimize the effectiveness of your washer/disinfector
  • Identify potential root causes of washer / disinfector monitoring failures

The Science of Speed – The Evolution of Biological Indicators

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the design and function of biological indicators
  • Discuss how biological indicator incubation time is determined
  • Understand how rapid readout biological indicators work

Sterile Processing in the ASC Environment – Are you ready for a survey?

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify sterile processing standards and guidelines relevant to the ambulatory surgery setting.
  • Describe best practices for instrument processing in the ambulatory surgery setting.
  • Develop a check off list to determine readiness for an accreditation survey.

Need more sterile processing CE learning? View the full course catalog.

Apr 17, 2015

Exclusive Continuing Education for Ambulatory Surgery Centers

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Continuing education for ambulatory surgery centers

Ambulatory surgery centers may be smaller in size than a hospital, but they still have many of the same challenges. Healthcare professionals who work in ambulatory surgery centers are concerned about the complex challenges of infection control from admission through discharge.

3M Infection Prevention strives to provide the right solutions that ambulatory surgery centers need. The new 3MSM Health Care Academy goes even further to support continued education and training for nurses, sterilization technicians, and healthcare professions. We cover a wide range of useful topics including: healthcare acquired infections, surgical site infections, sterilization, as well as emerging issues in surgical settings.

Making it easy in taking healthcare continuing education (CE) courses is the core of our education model. To help you get the CE credits you need, we offer free self-study courses that you can take on your own. All healthcare CE webinars are 60 minutes in length and available for viewing at your convenience. See a complete list of our free, self-study CE webinars

Here are some recent ambulatory surgery center CE courses that you might find helpful:

Sterilization and Disinfection in an Ambulatory Surgery Center Setting
Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the latest requirements and guidelines from accrediting organizations specifically relating to reprocessing of medical devices.
  •  Describe key published standards and recommended practices for safe and effective reprocessing of reusable patient care items.
  • List available resources that can help an ASC comply with best practice related to reprocessing of reusable medical devices.

ST79 Essentials for Ambulatory Surgery Centers
Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss AAMI ST79 and the need for the recommended practice.
  • Discuss the different types of steam sterilization processes and cycle parameters.
  • Describe the different types of sterilization monitoring devices, including PCDs.
  • Describe routine load release for implants and non-implants.

 

Apr 5, 2015

Learn about Best Practices in Sterile Processing

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infection-control-sterile-processing

In-depth knowledge of sterile processing procedures and the science of infection prevention are essential to help optimize the success of surgical procedures and patient outcomes. To keep our commitment to support best sterile processing practices to help reduce the risk of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), the 3MSM Health Care Academy has a full library of self-study healthcare continuing education (CE) courses. These sterile processing CE courses are presented by experts who understand the challenges sterilization professionals face. Here are some of the sterile processing CE courses we have recently added:

IUSS – Follow the Standards or Get Cited!
Learning Objectives:

  • Review the most current AORN and AAMI standards and recommended practices relating to IUSS.
  • Explain CMS’s Update of Survey and Certification Memorandum Regarding IUSS.
  • Identify The Joint Commissions’ standards related to IUSS.

Water Quality for CSSD 101
Learning Objectives:

  • Review the general structure and content of AAMI/TIR34:2014 Water for the reprocessing of medical devices.
  • Describe the importance of water quality and effective water treatment.
  • Identify categories of water quality for medical device reprocessing.
  • Define the selection of water quality.
  • Explain water quality monitoring.

Sterilization and Disinfection in an ASC Setting
Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the latest requirements and guidelines from accrediting organizations specifically relating to reprocessing of medical devices.
  • Describe key published standards and recommended practices for safe and effective reprocessing of reusable patient care items.
  • List available resources that can help an ASC comply with best practice related to reprocessing of reusable medical devices.

What a Gas: A Review of Today’s Low Temperature Sterilization Options               
Learning Objectives:

  • List the low temperature sterilization technologies that are available in the industry today.
  • Describe how each of the low temperature sterilization technologies work.
  • Recognize the benefits and limitations of each low temperature sterilization technology.
  • Identify the factors to be considered for choosing a low temperature sterilization technology.

ST79 Essentials for ASCs
Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss AAMI ST79 and the need for the recommended practice.
  • Discuss the different types of steam sterilization processes and cycle parameters.
  • Describe the different types of sterilization monitoring devices, including PCDs.
  •  Describe routine load release for implants and non-implants.

We are always adding new self-study sterile processing CE courses to the online catalog, so be sure to save or bookmark the 3MSM Health Care Academy page. These courses are free and are 3M Health Care Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nurses CEP 5770 for one contact hour.