Tag Archives: APIC

Jun 28, 2018

3M Science at APIC 2018

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3M Science at APIC 2018The biggest infection prevention conference of the year, the 45th APIC Annual Conference, was held last week right in 3M’s backyard of Minneapolis, Minnesota. We were excited to be part of the movement to advance the infection prevention efforts of facilities across the country and to help clinicians move toward reducing rates of preventable infections.

Breakfast Symposium: Reducing the Risks of CLABSI and SSI

On Friday morning, 160 APIC attendees gathered for a symposium on “Reducing the Risks of CLABSI and SSI: What Is the Evidence?” Mark Rupp, M.D., professor and chief of the division of Infectious Diseases and director of Infection Control & Epidemiology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, shared his expertise on evidence-based measures to prevent CLABSI/CRBSI. Peggy Prinz Luebbert, MS, CLS, CIC, CHSP, CSPDT, addressed interventions in preparing patients for surgery that help reduce the risk of SSI.

IP Survey: Human Factors and the Future of Infection Prevention

3M also highlighted the results from a survey of clinicians and infection preventionists (IPs), “Human Factors and the Future of Infection Prevention,” which uncovered the key challenges they face in their fight to reduce infections in their facilities.

The survey uncovered barriers that impact successful infection prevention, including a lack of adopting new technology and processes (51%), lack of senior leadership support (51%) and poor protocol compliance (50%). However, many IPs (45%) agree that their facility could prevent more infections with more high-quality data and tools. One-third of clinicians believe infections can be avoided entirely when providing care to patients.

We want to continue this conversation and find more ways to support clinicians in their fight against healthcare associated infections. Please join us July 11 for the first in a series of webinars to discuss the IP survey results.

Both the symposium and survey results emphasized the importance of preventing infections using a three-pronged approach: developing highly trained and committed people, incorporating industry standards and implementing evidence-based technology and we were excited to showcase some of our newest offerings that help clinicians in the fight to zero infections.

If you didn’t make it to the 3M booth at APIC 2018, here are some of the new product highlights:

3M™ Tegaderm™ Antimicrobial IV Advanced Securement Dressing

To better combat bloodstream infections, specifically peripheral line associated bloodstream infections (PLABSI), we introduced a new dressing to expand the 3M antimicrobial product offerings. The new dressing integrates 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) throughout the adhesive to suppress skin flora regrowth on prepped skin for up to 7 days, which can offer another line of defense against contamination. It also provides site visibility, catheter securement and is designed for consistent application. A non-bordered version of the dressing called Tegaderm Antimicrobial Transparent Dressing will also be available.

3M™ Skin and Nasal Antiseptic

Studies show that  approximately 30 percent of the population are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), the leading cause of surgical site infections (SSIs). And, more than 80 percent of surgical site infections from S. aureus come from the patient’s own nasal flora. To combat this issue, 3M’s Skin and Nasal Antiseptic provides clinicians a simple, one-time application that reduces nasal bacteria, including S. aureus and MRSA, by 99.5 percent in just one hour and maintains this reduction for at least 12 hours. 3M’s nasal antiseptic is the only one supported by more than ten investigator-initiated clinical studies showing a reduction to the risk of SSIs.

3M™ Single-Patient Stethoscope

Leading healthcare organizations recommend using a single-patient stethoscope in isolation care settings, but the single-use stethoscopes on the market often fall short in terms of durability, sound quality and comfort. The new 3M stethoscope helps reduce the risk of cross-contamination  in isolation environments by providing clinicians a high-quality, disposable stethoscope that combines excellent sound quality and comfort to help eliminate the need to use personal stethoscopes.

3M™ Bair Hugger™ Temperature Monitoring System

Core body temperature is a vital indicator of health or illness of the acute care patient. For surgical patients, a small drop in core body temperature drop can result in unintended hypothermia (a temperature below 36.0°C), which can contribute to a number ofpreventable surgical complications. The 3M Bair Hugger™ Temperature Monitoring System is a non-invasive, consistent and easy-to-use system that accurately and continuously measures the patient’s core body temperature throughout the entire perioperative journey,  helpingclinicians proactively own the normothermic temperature zone and improve patient outcomes.

3M™ Attest™ Super Rapid Biological Indicator (BI) System for Steam and 3M™ Attest™ Auto-reader 490 and 490H units

Sterile processing professionals work to clean, disinfect, and sterilize all of the instruments that allow the perioperative staff to enter surgery prepared with the tools of their trade. 3M offers sterilization assurance solutions and expertise so the sterile processing department and your OR staff know surgical instruments are safe for patient use. Our new Attest™ Dual Auto-reader technology allows facilities to incubate both steam and Hydrogen peroxide BIs in the same auto-reader with fast 24-minute results – and is available via a free software upgrade to qualified hardware. Simplify, standardize and streamline Sterile Processing Department workflows with 3M innovation and expertise.

Aug 3, 2017

Health care hygiene compliance: Not just for hands anymore?

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It’s time to add ‘and stethoscope hygiene’ to ‘practice hand hygiene’ signs

Stethoscope blog

Changing habits is hard. We can see the data, understand the science and even participate in a training session, yet we go back to doing it like we always did.

That is precisely what researchers observed and documented in a recently published quality improvement project on stethoscope hygiene. In the July issue of the American Journal of Infection Control from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), researchers found that healthcare providers rarely perform stethoscope hygiene between patient encounters, despite its importance for infection prevention. The authors call for the inclusion of stethoscope hygiene in all hand hygiene initiatives.

Infection prevention is a complex undertaking, and stethoscope hygiene is an important component. Here are a few simple tips from 3M™ Littmann® stethoscopes along with some hand hygiene essentials.

Stethoscope blog chart

Barriers to change may exist at several levels. Maybe there is a level of disbelief that stethoscopes get as contaminated as hands, despite what research shows. Maybe wiping stethoscopes is perceived as inconvenient or there’s concern that sanitizers and wipes will damage the stethoscope (Tip: All Littmann stethoscopes feature next-generation tubing with improved resistance to alcohol). Whatever the obstacles, let’s challenge ourselves to identify and overcome them. It’s essential to patient safety.

At 3M, we are committed to a future without preventable infections. As with hand hygiene, cleaning stethoscopes between patients should be expected in all health care settings and supported by leadership and clinicians alike. The future of infection prevention and superior patient care will be built upon a culture of compliance. Be a stethoscope hygiene champion in your facility!

 

Jun 1, 2016

It’s Time for APIC 2016!

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It’s Time for APIC 2016!

It’s Time for APIC 2016! And it’s time to get inspired – the APIC 43rd Annual Conference is almost here! From June 11-13, the infection prevention community – some 5,000 strong – will gather in beautiful, historic Charlotte, North Carolina to share and take in the latest breakthroughs and best practices from around the world. This three-day event is filled with opportunities to listen, learn and recharge with some of the industry’s most innovative thought leaders on infection prevention and control. We’ll be there, and we wanted you to know about some of the highlights:

What to see at APIC 2016 Conference

Disinfection and Sterilization: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Start this conference right with this plenary session featuring Dr. William Rutala, a professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Dr. Rutala presents a “good” classification scheme, improved data, and new technologies; the “bad” noncompliance, with guidelines for reprocessing medical/ surgical devices; and the “ugly” endoscope reprocessing and infection risks that may expose patients. Don’t miss it!

Integrating Infection Prevention Control Programs into the Ambulatory Care Setting: An Evolving Model 

Get a quick dose of ambulatory care expertise in this 30-minute session with Faith Skeete of NYU Medical Center and Natalie Fucito of NYU Langone.

Duodenoscopy

Hear the latest on a procedure that presents formidable challenges in infection control, presented by Maroya Walters of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

International Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) in Resource-Limited Settings

Here is a rare chance to attend a workshop on a globally vital topic, hosted by experts from the Liberian and Kenyan Ministries of Health as well as the Infection Control Africa Network and the US CDC.

Best Practices for High-Level Disinfection and Reprocessing Programs at Large Academic Health Institutions

Take the Emerging Science, Research, and Application track – this Concurrent Education session features the very latest information from experts from the Medical Center, Medical School and Health Department at the University of Minnesota.

Infection Prevention and Surveillance in Primary Care 

Explore the latest with officials from Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson College of Nursing and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

What to see in 3M Medical booth 1503

This year we are focusing on two topics that we get a considerable amount of questions on:

Endoscope reprocessing

Cleaning endoscopes is critical because residual organic material can inactivate disinfectants, allowing potentially deadly bacteria to remain on the surfaces. Facilities that achieve the highest standard of care proactively monitor manual cleaning protocols for flexible endoscopes. Read how routine endoscope cleaning monitoring can contribute to a higher standard of care.

Reducing the risk of surgical site infections

Patient safety is a primary concern for the perioperative team. A lot of attention is focused on skin preps and ways to reduce the patient’s bacterial load. One method is to use a nasal antiseptic before surgery. Before the conference, read a summary of clinical evidence about the efficacy of nasal antiseptics.

These are just a few examples of what’s inspiring us at this year’s APIC conference. We look forward to seeing you!

Jun 17, 2015

APIC 2015 What to See

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APIC Annual Conference 2015 Nashville, Tennessee

This year, the APIC 42nd Annual Conference will be held in the Music City – Nashville, Tennessee. Infection prevention leaders from across the U.S. and delegates from around the world will meet to discuss some of the new research and best practices. This three-day event (June 27-29) gives professionals the opportunity to learn, explore, and network. I want to share some things on my list that look to be thought-provoking:

APIC 2015 Conference Sessions

Disinfection Sterilization Track

This pre-conference workshop consists of lectures and discussions about the most recent breakthroughs in cleaning and disinfecting non-critical environmental surfaces. Also, reprocessing critical and semi critical medical devices will be addressed.

Topics Include

  • Present issues related to disinfection, antisepsis and sterilization in a healthcare setting
  • Innovative technologies and products for use in disinfecting, sterilizing and reprocessing
  • Unique issues and solutions linked with reprocessing medical devices, including endoscopes and surgical instruments
  • The most recent technologies for cleaning, disinfecting and decontaminating a room in order to reduce the possibility of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs)
  • Determine the role surfaces play in the transmission of viruses and epidemiologically important pathogens

Partnering to Mitigate Infection Prevention Risks at Ambulatory Care Sites

This session examines various methods for creating programs to alleviate infection prevention risks in various ambulatory care settings. It will also examine which tools are best for assessing, tracing and reporting on an ambulatory site’s adherence to regulations.

Learning Objectives

  • Determine Infection Prevention vulnerabilities in various ambulatory care settings by utilizing a risk assessment tool
  • Collect resources and assemble a team of individuals to work together in alleviating identified risks at ambulatory care sites
  • Construct a tracer tool using the ambulatory care site risk assessment
  • Using the tracer tool to assess improvements and any continuing risks that can be summarized and then shared with stakeholders

A Decade of Investment in Infection Prevention: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

This candid discussion addresses Infection Prevention resources. It also discusses how these resources relate to healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Exploration of the current study will highlight its strengths and weaknesses. Everyone is encouraged to participate.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the relationship between HAI prevention and Infection Prevention resourcing
  • Explain the challenges associated with Infection Prevention resourcing
  • Objectively evaluate their Infection Prevention programs for resource needs

What Do Infection Preventionists Want to Know? A Review of Queries from IP Talk and APIC.org

This presentation reviews topics and posts from IP Talk and searches of www.apic.org

Learning Objectives

  • Identify common topics using the data collected from APIC members who utilize apic.org searches and IP talk
  • Address how this data reveals the priorities of APIC and its research committee
  • Use this information to create chapter-specific and facility research ideas

Finally – Visit 3M Infection Prevention Solutions Booth 1100!

In the 3M Infection Prevention Solutions booth 1100, we are highlighting a variety of our products. Here, you can try 3M™ Skin and Nasal Antiseptic, some of the 3M™ Avagard™ Hand Hygiene products, and learn more about the 3M™ Clean-Trace™ Hygiene Management System. We want to share some clinical research and have you experience our products.

We look forward to seeing you in Nashville!