Tag Archives: healthcare CE

May 5, 2016

Remember the importance of hand hygiene

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Hospital hand hygiene

Imagine your Mom gets sick and is admitted to the hospital. A healthcare provider arrives and starts checking her vitals. You notice they’re not wearing gloves and didn’t wash their hands. But you were afraid to ask. A month goes by and Mom takes a turn for the worse.  She’s back in the hospital, this time, she has a new infection. Out of the blue. Where did this come from? Was it from the healthcare provider who didn’t wash their hands? Could something as simple as using soap and water or hand sanitizer have prevented this? I wish I would’ve said something.

As everyone knows, hand hygiene is critical on a daily basis. Once a year on May 5, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiates a global campaign, Save Lives: Clean Your Hands day to engage healthcare facilities on the importance of hand hygiene. The WHO campaign supports the importance of hand hygiene in healthcare and the improvement of hand hygiene globally. Professor Didier Pittet, from WHO, stresses that washing hands saves lives. Watch his Adapt to Adopt video to see some creative ways on how facilities are focusing on hand hygiene improvements.

Are you following WHO’s recommendations for My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene?

  1. Before touching a patient.
  2. Before clean and aseptic procedures (eg. inserting devices such as catheters).
  3. After contact with body fluids.
  4. After touching a patient.
  5. After touching patient surroundings.

In support of WHO’s campaign, we want to help you drive proper hand hygiene compliance throughout your healthcare facility. Take time to review the on-demand educational opportunities below. The fight against infection is in your hands.

Getting Hand Hygiene to the Next Level Through Value Based Improvement in a Culture of Safety

Hand Antiseptics Formulation and Regulation…What’s Involved in Developing the Products You Use

Surgical Hand Antisepsis

Importance of a Clean Environment in Keeping Hands Clean

Leading the Way: Healthcare Facility Hygiene

Hand Hygiene in the Perioperative Setting-Reviewing the Recommended Practice

Feb 12, 2016

If You Struggle With Sterile Processing, Then Read This

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Sterile processing department

Sterile processing is an important function that is vital to every health care facility. Sterile processing technicians need up-to-date, helpful information about standards, guidelines, and recommended practices. To make it easy for technicians to learn best practices, 3MSM  Health Care Academy created a full catalog of free self-study and live continuing education (CE) courses presented by technical experts. Here is a list of some of the most popular 1 hour sterile processing CE courses over the past 12 months.

Sterilization & Disinfection in an ASC Setting

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the latest requirements and guidelines from accrediting organizations specifically relating to reprocessing of medical devices.
  • Describe key published standards and recommended practices for safe and effective reprocessing of reusable patient care items.
  • List available resources that can help an ASC comply with best practice related to reprocessing of reusable medical devices.

ST79 Essentials for ASCs

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss AAMI ST79 and the need for the recommended practice.
  • Discuss the different types of steam sterilization processes and cycle parameters.
  • Describe the different types of sterilization monitoring devices, including PCDs.
  • Describe routine load release for implants and non-implants.

What a Gas: A Review of Today’s Low Temperature Sterilization Options

Learning Objectives:

  • List the low temperature sterilization technologies that are available in the industry today.
  • Describe how each of the low temperature sterilization technologies work.
  • Recognize the benefits and limitations of each low temperature sterilization technology.
  • Identify the factors to be considered for choosing a low temperature sterilization technology.

IUSS – Follow the Standards or Get Cited!

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the most current AORN and AAMI standards and recommended practices relating to IUSS.
  • Explain CMS’s Update of Survey and Certification Memorandum Regarding IUSS.
  • Identify The Joint Commissions’ standards related to IUSS.

Steam Sterilization Qualification and Troubleshooting: Process Failures and Wet Packs

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss steam sterilization qualification testing.
  • Describe available tools to help guide an investigational process on sterilization process failures and wet pack/load assessment.
  • Identify common reasons for steam sterilization process failures and wet packs/loads.

Are you following me? A Surgical Instrument Tray Tracer

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how tracer methodology applies to sterile processing.
  • Discuss how IFU’s, competencies and processes may be observed by surveyors.
  • Understand the importance of following manufacturers’ IFU.

Duodenoscopes: Are Current Reprocessing Guidelines Adequate?

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain why duodenoscope reprocessing is currently under scrutiny.
  • Summarize the clinical literature describing outbreaks following exposure to duodenoscopes.
  • Discuss the reprocessing challenges that are unique to duodenoscopes.
  • Outline available and proposed options for improving duodenoscope reprocessing.

The Nuts and Bolts of Washers and Disinfectors

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the steps in a washer/disinfector cycle and the purpose of each step
  • Discuss thermal disinfection and the A0 concept
  • Review means to optimize the effectiveness of your washer/disinfector
  • Identify potential root causes of washer / disinfector monitoring failures

The Science of Speed – The Evolution of Biological Indicators

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the design and function of biological indicators
  • Discuss how biological indicator incubation time is determined
  • Understand how rapid readout biological indicators work

Sterile Processing in the ASC Environment – Are you ready for a survey?

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify sterile processing standards and guidelines relevant to the ambulatory surgery setting.
  • Describe best practices for instrument processing in the ambulatory surgery setting.
  • Develop a check off list to determine readiness for an accreditation survey.

Need more sterile processing CE learning? View the full course catalog.

Sep 3, 2015

The Science Behind Patient Warming and the Benefits of Normothermia

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Perioperative Patient Warming

Read the study summary – Target Normothermia: A Global Focus on Inadvertent Hypothermia

Thermoregulation

Under normal circumstances, the body controls its temperature within a very tight tolerance, with the core being 2-4˚C warmer than the periphery. This temperature gradient between the core and the periphery is caused by normal thermoregulatory vasoconstriction. Anesthesia induction results in vasodilation, which allows the warmer blood to flow freely from the core and mix with the blood from the cooler periphery, lowering the core body temperature. Research has shown that in the first 60 minutes under anesthesia unwarmed surgical patients can lose up to 1.6˚C1,a phenomenon known as redistribution temperature drop (RTD).

Unintended perioperative hypothermia

Unintended hypothermia remains a common—but easily preventable—complication of surgery.2 It is estimated that unintended hypothermia, defined as a core body temperature of less than 36.0°C (96.8°F), occurs in more than 50% of all US surgical patients, even those undergoing short procedures (one to one-and-a-half hours).3

Numerous studies have demonstrated that even mild perioperative hypothermia can result in significant complications. Unfortunately, temperature management of the surgical patient remains a secondary consideration in many perioperative settings rather than an essential standard of care.

Benefits of normothermia

The benefits of maintaining normothermia have been thoroughly researched and documented in independent peer-reviewed articles. A number of these studies are randomized controlled studies that document the importance of preventing hypothermia.

In a landmark meta-analysis performed by Chris Brown Mahoney, she captured the essence of earlier research which identified dramatic decreases in the complication rates and the related patient care costs that can be avoided by keeping patients normothermic. Normothermia is a process improvement that touches the entire patient care algorithm. This meta-analysis of 20 studies covering 1,575 patients identified reductions in patient costs in several different areas when normothermia is maintained such as:5

  • Reduction in the use of blood products
  • Shortened length of hospital stay
  • Decreased ICU time
  • Reduced rate of wound infection
  • Decreased likelihood of myocardial infarction
  • Lower mortality rates

There is also a significant financial benefit of reducing hypothermia rates in surgical patients. Maintaining normothermia can result in savings of $2,500 to $7,000 per patient by eliminating the costs of hypothermia-related complications, including surgical site infections.5

Study Summary: Target Normothermia: A Global Focus on Inadvertent Hypothermia

References
  1. Sessler DI, Current concepts: mild perioperative hypothermia. N Eng J Med 1997; 336: 1730-1737.
  2. Kurz A, Sessler DI, Lenhardt R. Perioperative normothermia to reduce the incidence of surgical-wound infection and shorten hospitalization. Study of Wound Infection and Temperature Group. N Engl J Med 1996;334:1209–1215.
  3. Young VL, Watson ME. Prevention of Perioperative Hypothermia in Plastic Surgery. Aesthetic Surgery Journal. 2006;26(5):551-571.
  4. Sessler DI, Kurz A. Mild Perioperative Hypothermia. Anesthesiology News. October 2008: 17-28.
  5. Mahoney CB, Odom J. Maintaining intraoperative normothermia: A meta-analysis of outcomes with costs. AANA Journal. 1999;67(2):155-164
Apr 17, 2015

Exclusive Continuing Education for Ambulatory Surgery Centers

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Continuing education for ambulatory surgery centers

Ambulatory surgery centers may be smaller in size than a hospital, but they still have many of the same challenges. Healthcare professionals who work in ambulatory surgery centers are concerned about the complex challenges of infection control from admission through discharge.

3M Infection Prevention strives to provide the right solutions that ambulatory surgery centers need. The new 3MSM Health Care Academy goes even further to support continued education and training for nurses, sterilization technicians, and healthcare professions. We cover a wide range of useful topics including: healthcare acquired infections, surgical site infections, sterilization, as well as emerging issues in surgical settings.

Making it easy in taking healthcare continuing education (CE) courses is the core of our education model. To help you get the CE credits you need, we offer free self-study courses that you can take on your own. All healthcare CE webinars are 60 minutes in length and available for viewing at your convenience. See a complete list of our free, self-study CE webinars

Here are some recent ambulatory surgery center CE courses that you might find helpful:

Sterilization and Disinfection in an Ambulatory Surgery Center Setting
Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the latest requirements and guidelines from accrediting organizations specifically relating to reprocessing of medical devices.
  •  Describe key published standards and recommended practices for safe and effective reprocessing of reusable patient care items.
  • List available resources that can help an ASC comply with best practice related to reprocessing of reusable medical devices.

ST79 Essentials for Ambulatory Surgery Centers
Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss AAMI ST79 and the need for the recommended practice.
  • Discuss the different types of steam sterilization processes and cycle parameters.
  • Describe the different types of sterilization monitoring devices, including PCDs.
  • Describe routine load release for implants and non-implants.

 

Apr 5, 2015

Learn about Best Practices in Sterile Processing

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infection-control-sterile-processing

In-depth knowledge of sterile processing procedures and the science of infection prevention are essential to help optimize the success of surgical procedures and patient outcomes. To keep our commitment to support best sterile processing practices to help reduce the risk of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), the 3MSM Health Care Academy has a full library of self-study healthcare continuing education (CE) courses. These sterile processing CE courses are presented by experts who understand the challenges sterilization professionals face. Here are some of the sterile processing CE courses we have recently added:

IUSS – Follow the Standards or Get Cited!
Learning Objectives:

  • Review the most current AORN and AAMI standards and recommended practices relating to IUSS.
  • Explain CMS’s Update of Survey and Certification Memorandum Regarding IUSS.
  • Identify The Joint Commissions’ standards related to IUSS.

Water Quality for CSSD 101
Learning Objectives:

  • Review the general structure and content of AAMI/TIR34:2014 Water for the reprocessing of medical devices.
  • Describe the importance of water quality and effective water treatment.
  • Identify categories of water quality for medical device reprocessing.
  • Define the selection of water quality.
  • Explain water quality monitoring.

Sterilization and Disinfection in an ASC Setting
Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the latest requirements and guidelines from accrediting organizations specifically relating to reprocessing of medical devices.
  • Describe key published standards and recommended practices for safe and effective reprocessing of reusable patient care items.
  • List available resources that can help an ASC comply with best practice related to reprocessing of reusable medical devices.

What a Gas: A Review of Today’s Low Temperature Sterilization Options               
Learning Objectives:

  • List the low temperature sterilization technologies that are available in the industry today.
  • Describe how each of the low temperature sterilization technologies work.
  • Recognize the benefits and limitations of each low temperature sterilization technology.
  • Identify the factors to be considered for choosing a low temperature sterilization technology.

ST79 Essentials for ASCs
Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss AAMI ST79 and the need for the recommended practice.
  • Discuss the different types of steam sterilization processes and cycle parameters.
  • Describe the different types of sterilization monitoring devices, including PCDs.
  •  Describe routine load release for implants and non-implants.

We are always adding new self-study sterile processing CE courses to the online catalog, so be sure to save or bookmark the 3MSM Health Care Academy page. These courses are free and are 3M Health Care Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nurses CEP 5770 for one contact hour.